Tell government to make Outback carbon farming a reality

Carbon farming is breathing life back into the Wheatbelt. But just over the fence in WA’s Outback, it's not allowed.

— Kent Broad, Carbon Neutral Pty Ltd

Kent Broad has been a farmer all his life, and now he's a carbon farmer. He's seen first-hand the benefits that carbon farming has brought to WA's Wheatbelt - but the Outback is missing out.


Three reasons why the Outback needs carbon farming

  1. Grow back the bush - carbon farming would give native bush the chance to recover and regenerate, creating more habitat for native animals.
  2. Tackle climate change - carbon farming in the Outback would have a positive impact on climate change, equivalent to installing 35,000 new wind turbines.
  3. Provide new income and jobs for pastoralists and for remote communities.

Carbon farming – the essentials

  • Carbon farming involves allowing native bush to regrow, storing carbon in soil and vegetation, and selling carbon credits on the carbon market.
  • It is currently allowed on WA’s freehold land which is largely found in the Wheatbelt, but not on Crown land which makes up almost 90% of our state.
  • Through carbon farming, native, perennial vegetation has a chance to recover from the effects of overgrazing in decades past. Restoring native vegetation is good for the health of the ecosystem and creates more habitat for native animals. It helps address climate change and strengthen the social fabric of our Outback by providing jobs and income.
  • Outdated laws are holding back WA. NSW, for example, already has over 140 carbon farming projects. WA has 8.
  • In coming years, the market for carbon credits is expected to grow exponentially, and the enormous size of WA’s Outback will provide an edge in global carbon markets.
  • Government royalties from carbon could be used to restore landscapes in carbon-poor areas to help protect nature and grow jobs.

Will you send a message today?

    What do you want to do?

    Dear Premier [and local MP],

    Yours sincerely,
    [Your name will be added automatically]


    Tips to help write your message

    • Carbon farming could be an exciting new opportunity for the land and people of WA’s Outback.

    • It would help restore our landscapes, create more habitat for wildlife and help fight climate change while providing new jobs and income for pastoralists and remote communities.

    • Carbon farming is already transforming parts of WA’s Wheatbelt, but across the rest of WA (which is 90% of our state and regarded as ‘Outback’) carbon farming isn’t allowed.

    • It’s great that the WA Government has indicated positive support for carbon farming, but it should now be a top priority to reform our outdated laws, develop the necessary policy, and allow land managers to get on with the job.

    • Carbon farming in the Outback would be a win for people, nature, jobs and our climate.

    • Please let me know what you’re going to do.

    Three reasons why the Outback needs carbon farming

    1. Grow back the bush - carbon farming would give native bush the chance to recover and regenerate, creating more habitat for native animals.
    2. Tackle climate change - carbon farming in the Outback would have a positive impact on climate change, equivalent to installing 35,000 new wind turbines.
    3. Provide new income and jobs for pastoralists and for remote communities.

    Carbon farming – the essentials

    • Carbon farming involves allowing native bush to regrow, storing carbon in soil and vegetation, and selling carbon credits on the carbon market.
    • It is currently allowed on WA’s freehold land which is largely found in the Wheatbelt, but not on Crown land which makes up almost 90% of our state.
    • Through carbon farming, native, perennial vegetation has a chance to recover from the effects of overgrazing in decades past. Restoring native vegetation is good for the health of the ecosystem and creates more habitat for native animals. It helps address climate change and strengthen the social fabric of our Outback by providing jobs and income.
    • Outdated laws are holding back WA. NSW, for example, already has over 140 carbon farming projects. WA has 8.
    • In coming years, the market for carbon credits is expected to grow exponentially, and the enormous size of WA’s Outback will provide an edge in global carbon markets.
    • Government royalties from carbon could be used to restore landscapes in carbon-poor areas to help protect nature and grow jobs.
    WILL YOU SIGN?